Income Needed to Qualify for a Mortgage Loan

Income Needed to Qualify for a Mortgage Loan

When you apply for a home loan, the mortgage lender will conduct a thorough review of your income situation. Income is one of the most important factors to a lender, along with your credit score and debt level. This article answers a common, income-related question that home buyers often ask: How much income is needed to qualify for a mortgage loan?

The first thing to know is that mortgage lending standards and requirements can vary from one lender to the next. For example, if I approach a handful of lenders about a certain home loan, and my income level is on the “border” of acceptability, one company might approve me for the loan while others turn me down. That’s because they have their own business models and assessment procedures.

In addition, your household income level is only one piece of the mortgage qualification process. Lenders will review other things as well, including your credit score and your total amount of debt. Remember, your debt takes away a big part of your income — so the two things are usually reviewed together.

How Much Income to Qualify?

These days, most lenders set the bar somewhere around 43% to 45% for the total debt-to-income ratio or DTI. This means that if your recurring monthly debts use up more than 45% of your monthly income, you might have trouble qualifying for a loan. On the other hand, a borrower who only uses about 35% of her income to cover the monthly debts should be in good shape, as far as lenders are concerned.

These numbers are not set in stone. Some lenders may allow total DTI ratios above 45%, especially when there are certain “compensating factors.”

According to the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB):

“Larger lenders may still make a mortgage loan if your debt-to-income ratio is more than 43 percent … But they will have to make a reasonable, good-faith effort, following the CFPB’s rules, to determine that you have the ability to repay the loan.”

So, where do you stand? What’s your total debt-to-income ratio? You can find plenty of calculators online to help you calculate your DTI level. That’s a good place to continue your research.

Applying for a Mortgage Quote

When you’ve done the necessary research, and feel that you’re ready to take on a mortgage loan, the next logical step is to apply for quotes from lenders. The good news is that this process is easier than ever, thanks to the internet. You can apply online and get information sent to you by email.

Granted, you’ll have to fill out a more complete application at some point, along with plenty of supporting documents (tax records, bank statements, etc.). But the initial online application is a good way to get the ball rolling.

Don’t Overstretch Your Income

The last point I want to make is that a mortgage lender cannot tell you what you can afford. They can only tell you what they are willing to lend you, in terms of a loan. You must determine your own affordability limits before you even start talking to lenders.

Doing some basic budget math up front could help you avoid financial issues down the road. So take a good, hard look at your current debt and income situation — and decide what you’re comfortable paying each month in the form of a mortgage payment.

Mortgage Rates Rise to Their Highest Level in Over Four Years

Are you thinking about buying a home in the near future? Do you need a mortgage loan to finance your purchase? Here’s a trend you should know about. This week, the average rate for a 30-year fixed-rate mortgage loan rose to its highest level since 2013. This is based on the weekly industry survey conducted by Freddie Mac.

Mortgage Rates Hit 4-Year High in April 2018

On April 26, 2018, Freddie Mac published the latest results of its Primary Mortgage Market Survey (PMMS). This survey has been running for decades, and it gives us good insight into various trends. The company describes it as “the foremost reliable, representative source of regional and national mortgage rate trends.”

Here are the results of the survey for the week of April 26, 2018:

•    30-year fixed mortgage loans had an average rate of 4.58%.
•    15-year fixed mortgage loans had an average rate of 4.02%.
•    5/1 adjustable (ARM) loans had an average rate of 3.74%.

Here’s what is truly noteworthy about these latest indicators. The average rate for a 30-year fixed mortgage (the most popular loan product used by home buyers) just hit its highest level in years. To date, the average rate for a 30-year home loan hasn’t been this high since August 2013.

As Freddie Mac officials reported in their April 26 report:

“Mortgage rates increased for the third consecutive week, climbing 11 basis points to 4.58 percent. Rates are now at their highest level since the week of August 22, 2013. Higher Treasury yields, driven by rising commodity prices, more Treasury issuances and the steady stream of solid economic news, are behind the uptick in rates over the past week.”

Buying a Home Now Versus Later

Granted, the interest rates that are actually assigned to home loans can vary from one borrower to the next, and for a number of reasons. Loan type, credit scores, and discount points all play a role. The numbers above are merely averages across all of the surveyed lenders.

It’s the overall trend here that’s most important. And the trend is that average mortgage rates have shot up quite a bit over the last few months.

Home prices, meanwhile, continue to rise in most cities across the country. According to the real estate information company Zillow, the nationwide median home value rose by around 8% over the last year (as of April 2018). And while prices have slowed a down a bit in many areas, they are expected to continue moving north over the coming months — and into 2019.

These are important trends for home buyers, particularly those who need mortgage financing to complete their purchases. Rising rates can chip away at your buying power, as can rising home values. So those who are planning to buy a home in 2018 might want to consider purchasing sooner rather than later.

7 Mortgage Tips for First-Time Home Buyers

The mortgage lending process can be somewhat intimidating, especially for first-time home buyers who’ve never been through it before. There’s so much money on the line, and so many steps along the way.

Below, we have assembled a “top-seven” list of mortgage tips for home buyers. Once you finish reading this list, you’ll have a much better understanding of how it all works.

1. Study the mortgage types.

Each type of mortgage loan comes with its own set of pros and cons. Some products are ideal for certain types of buyers but disadvantageous for others. To decide which type of loan is right for you, you’ll need to know the pluses and minuses of each type. Start by learning the pros and cons of (A) conventional versus government-backed loans, and (B) adjustable-rate versus fixed-rate loans. These are your two biggest choices.

2. Consider your staying time.

How long do you plan to stay in the home? This will often determine which type of home loan is best for you. For instance, an adjustable-rate mortgage (ARM) could lower your interest rate up front, when compared to a fixed-rate mortgage. But if you stay in the home beyond the ARM loan’s introductory period, you’ll face the uncertainty of interest rate adjustments. The 30-year fixed-rate mortgage is the most popular type of loan these days.

3. Consider all types of lenders.

Many first-time home buyers don’t realize they can find mortgage financing locally, at local banks and credit unions. It’s true. So when shopping around for a lender and a loan program, be sure to look beyond the “big banks.” Don’t limit yourself. Keep your options open. If you have an existing relationship with a bank or credit union, ask them if they offer home loans.

4. Shop for the best rate.

Mortgage lenders will offer interest rates based on your credit history and credit score. When your credit is good, lenders might offer you a lower rate. When your credit is bad, the opposite can be true. Each lender defines their comfort level differently, so interest rates may vary from one company to the next. This is why it’s so important to get offers from multiple lenders.

5. Consider paying points.

One “point” is equal to one percent of the loan amount. (On a mortgage loan for $200,000, a single point would equal $2,000.) Some home buyers pay points at closing in order to lower their interest rate over the life of the loan. It’s a tradeoff. You can pay more upfront, and out of pocket, to lower your total interests costs over time. This can be a wise strategy over the long term, but it might not work out well for a shorter stay. Ask your lender to show you pricing strategies both with and without points being paid.

6. Don’t go it alone.

Most of us have friends or family members who own homes. These are good sources of information. Somebody who has been through the process and seen mortgage loans from “all sides” can often provide great information. You should also enlist the support of your real estate agent. A real estate agent is not a mortgage advisor, but most are well-informed about the mortgage process.

7. Factor in PMI.

PMI stands for private mortgage insurance. If your down payment on a house is less than 20%, your lender might require that you pay PMI. This will increase the size of your monthly payments. If you can afford to put 20% down, you’ll avoid having to pay PMI. It’s possible to get a mortgage loan with a down payment below 20%, but you’ll probably end up paying mortgage insurance of some kind — either private or government. When you get mortgage estimates from lenders, any required mortgage insurance should be included in the quote. But ask about it anyway, just to be sure.

Let us know if you are ready to start the process to purchase your first home. We would love to help you find the lender that is just right for you.